Reading List 2021

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Linda Dynel, Leaving Dorian, (2014)

Susan G.S. McGee, 20 Reasons Why She Stays: A Guide For Those Who Want to Help Battered Women, (2005) – This paper can be viewed an downloaded at: www.stopviolence.com/domviol/whytheystay.htm

Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (2002)

Jackson Katz, The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help (2006)

Michael Kimmel, Guyland: The Perilous World Where Boys Become Men, Understanding the Critical Years Between 16 and 26 (2008)

Jody Raphael, Saving Bernice: Battered Women, Welfare and Poverty (2000)

Michael P. Johnson, A Typology of Domestic Violence, (2008)

Robbin S. Ogle & Susan Jacobs, Self-Defense and Battered Women Who Kill (2002)

Evan Stark, Coercive Control: How Men Entrap Women in Personal Life (2002)

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re A Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality In High School (2012)

Jody Raphael, Listening to Olivia: Violence, Poverty & Prostitution (2004)

Michael Kimmel, Angry White Men (2013)

Natalie J. Sokoloff, Domestic Violence at the Margins (2005)

Michelle Kaminsky, Reflections of a Domestic Violence Prosecutor: Suggestions for Reform (2011)

Gavin DeBecker, The Gift of Fear (1997)

Erin Pizzey, Scream Quietly or the Neighbors Will Hear (1974)

Del Martin, Battered Wives (1976)

Jackson Katz, Leading Men: Presidential Campaigns & The Politics of Manhood (2013)

Jackson Katz, Man Enough: Trump, Clinton & The Politics of Presidential Masculinity (2016)

Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (2010)

Sarah Herman, Feminism in 100 Quotes (2018)

Roxane Gay, Bad Feminist (2014)

Kayleen Schaefer, Text Me When You Get Home: The Evolution & Triumph of Modern Female Friendship (2018)

Glennon Doyle, Untamed (2020)

Sow & Friedman, Big Friendship: How We Keep Each Other Close (2020)

Florence Given, Women Don’t Owe You Pretty (2020)

Rozsika Parker & Griselda Pollock, Old Mistresses: Women, Art & Ideology (1981)

Maya Angelou, Phenomenal Woman, (1978)

Mikki Kendall, Hood Feminism, (2020)

**Please also see my blog posts under Domestic Violence and “Think About It” Thursdays

Summer 2017

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Family time at the Pittsburgh Zoo – 90+ degrees … we were melting!

It was a busy summer, to say the least; weddings, family road trips and lots of reading, because here in Western New York it did nothing but rain! On the up-side, I still found time to schedule three fantastic presentations with three distinctly different agencies. Each was unique and interesting in its own way and I feel lucky to have been asked by each group to spend some time with their employees, volunteers and clients.

 

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Oh, and there were cupcakes …

In late June I had the privilege of speaking with an amazing group of foster parents at KidsPeace. My presentation focused on childhood trauma and how that related to my own experience with domestic violence, but we covered so much more than that in the nearly three hours that I spent with them.

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… and a dog 🙂

 

 

KidsPeace, founded in 1882, is a private charity dedicated to serving the behavioral and mental health needs of children, families and communities. The organization was originally a home for children orphaned by a smallpox epidemic, but has grown over the years to meet the ever-changing needs of children and adolescents. KidsPeace offers services in Georgia, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Our continuum of care includes a psychiatric hospital; a comprehensive range of residential treatment programs; accredited educational services; and a variety of foster care and community-based treatment programs to help children and families in need transform their lives.”  www.kidspeace.org

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Honest conversations lead to change! So happy to be invited to speak to some of the tireless advocates who are working on behalf of women and children in Niagara County.

 

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With only about ten women in attendance, it was a completely different vibe than I’m accustomed to. Twenty minutes of intense learning – on everyone’s part 🙂

I’ve never delivered a presentation to a group comprised almost entirely of men, but that’s exactly where I unveiled my newest presentation – Domestic Violence & Being An Engaged Bystander – on August 2 at Starpoint Senior High School in Pendleton, NY. Nearly 350 youth football coaches and statisticians were in attendance at NEYSA’s All Coaches meeting. I opted to speak without a mic, because often times people talk “under” you when you use one. The vast majority of these gentlemen were just that – absolute gentlemen. Maybe a little disinterested at first? Sure. But as I talked they listened and quieted and (many) even set aside their phones. I watched their faces go from polite, required attention to, “…oh my god…that actually happened to you…? Are you serious? How could that have happened to you…?” The shock, sadness and disgust that washed over many of the attendees was palpable. Here’s hoping that if these coaches are faced with a family that’s in need of intervention, they’ll remember that feeling (and where they put the paperwork I provided!) and will feel confident in their ability to provide a shoulder and a referral to those in need.